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Cold Welding Vs TIG Welding

Cold Welding Vs TIG Welding

Cold Welding: What Is It?

No heat is used to unite the metal parts during the cold welding procedure. The metal never melts; it always exists in a solid state. In this sense, cold welding is a type of solid-state welding.

Instead, the energy needed to bind the metal is applied through pressure. Cold welding, also known as friction welding or arc welding, differs from fusion welding in that no liquid or molten metal is involved. 

Pressure is exerted to squeeze the workpiece surfaces as closely as possible. Metal atoms leap from one piece to the next once they are compressed together, regardless of the nanoscale distance. The two independent pieces of metal combine into a single mass and form a nearly flawless bond with almost no consequences. However, you must meticulously clean the metal surfaces to accomplish this. Before attempting to cold weld, remove oxide coatings on every metal.

There is only one type of cold welding. Instead, there are three approaches with similar names such as cold metal transfer, cold TIG welding, EPOXY bonding.

What are The Uses Of Cold Welding?

Many industries use cold welding, including production, aerospace, automotive, and electronics. It is often used to join wires, especially those made of different metals. Since heat-induced welding processes can ignite hazardous vapors when applied to lay underground cables, cold welding is ideal.

Additionally, it is frequently used to seal heat-sensitive containers, such as explosive containers. Cold welding is typically used when applying heat would be dangerous or too destructive.

Pros Of Cold Welding

  • An excellent method for combining aluminum and copper, two metals that are difficult to weld using conventional methods.
  • Most heat-affected zone (HAZ) issues are eliminated because welding arcs don't produce concentrated heat or HAZs.
  • Provides a nearly faultless welding joint free of microfractures, brittle intermetallic compounds, and other joint flaws.
  • Reduces the level of expertise needed to weld exotic metals by being able to link a wide variety of dissimilar metals that are typically challenging to fuse.

Cons Of Cold Welding

  • The metal may need to be cleaned and prepared several ways to ensure the surface is spotless.
  • Surface imperfections, pollution, and nanoscale molecule structures may hamper results.
  • A challenge in an industrial context due to airborne dust and other debris
  • Cold welding only works with non-ferrous ductile metals like copper, aluminum, lead, gold, etc., and cannot be done on carbon steel or other toughened metals.
  • The most reliable results are obtained on flat surfaces because irregular forms are challenging to cold weld.

TIG Welding: What Is It?

TIG, referred to as inert tungsten gas, uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode to create an arc and weld metal. It is necessary to utilize a shielding gas, usually pure argon or argon mixed with helium. Depending on the type of metal being connected, either direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC) is applied throughout the welding process.

The American Welding Society ("AWS") defines TIG welding as "gas tungsten arc welding." Heliarc was the original name of the process, but it is rarely used today.

Due to the absence of physical contact between the electrode and the metal pieces, TIG welding differs from other types of welding. The arc is so stable and clean and generates attractive welds to the eye.

Electrodes are used in other arc welding techniques interacting physically with the metal. In addition, they may use various fluxing chemicals, leading to spatter and less control over the welding arc.

Precision welding and uniting rare metals like stainless steel, aluminum, Chromoly, nickel alloys, and magnesium are frequently accomplished using gas tungsten arc welding. However, it is also used to weld ordinary mild steel when exact joint quality is required. Because it is quicker and simpler, MIG welding is better suited to mild steel.

Read More: MIG vs Stick vs TIG Welding Process

What Are The Uses Of TIG Welding?

Precision welding and uniting rare metals like stainless steel, aluminum, Chromoly, nickel alloys, and magnesium are frequently accomplished using gas tungsten arc welding. However, it is also used to weld ordinary mild steel when exact joint quality is required. Because it is quicker and simpler, MIG welding is better suited to mild steel.

Aluminum and magnesium are two materials that can only be TIG welded. Aluminum can also be welded with MIG, although AC TIG welds are the most effective. That's because, whereas DCEN prevents surface oxides from penetrating the substance, DCEP eliminates them. Unlike TIG welders, MIG welding power sources cannot offer complete control.

Pros Of TIG Welding

  • Ideal joint quality
  • Practically every material is welded.
  • Fantastic for thin stock
  • Minimal possibility of weld contamination
  • Weld with or without filler metal
  • Smoke or splatter-free
  • There is no need for slag or flux.
  • Permits all welding positions
  • The highest level of arc and heat input control
  • Gives the arc and weld pool exceptional visibility.
  • TIG creates the most appealing welds.

Read More: Difference Between MIG and TIG Welding

Cons Of TIG Welding

  • The learning process is difficult.
  • TIG welding is a labor-intensive procedure that decreases output.
  • Small errors in the travel speed, amperage output, pulse settings, or tungsten preparation can greatly impact the weld's quality.
  • When welding outside, shielding gas is expelled.
  • costly equipment.
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